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Lynda Benglis
Fuentes

6 March—29 June 2024
Jardines de Banca March, Madrid, Spain

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The Banca March garden in Madrid, will host the installation of four monumental pieces by artist Lynda Benglis from the end of February until June 2024. This is the first time that works by one of the most relevant American sculptors of the 20th and 21st centuries can be seen in Spain. In 1970, Life magazine proclaimed her heir to Jackson Pollock and in 2022 she was selected by The New York Times Style Magazine for its special edition The Greats. At 82 years old, after six decades of work, she is still active.

Banca March's historic commitment to culture and art is evident in this installation by Lynda Benglis. Alongside Vande, an international firm specialised in the private sale of works of art and cultural production, it is conceived around the idea of ​​fountains and water as evocative symbols of sustainability. Since its founding in 1926, Banca March has remained faithful to its commitment to generating a positive impact on its environment and contributing to the development of society. Banca March is committed to creating not only economic, but also social value, in an environmentally friendly and sustainable manner, over time relying on a unique business model based on the joint growth of clients, professionals, shareholders and society at large.

On the verge of celebrating its centenary in 2026, Banca March will open the garden of its Madrid headquarters two days a week until June. During this period, visitors will be able to contemplate the four fountains located in different locations in the garden, a green island in the shadow of an emblematic building from the early 20th century, located in Madrid's Salamanca neighbourhood.

Regarding the importance of Lynda Benglis' work, Anne Pontégnie, who curated the exhibition together with Vande, states: “Lynda Benglis is a colossal figure within contemporary sculpture. Her work can be interpreted as a constant effort to capture movement, an attempt to freeze and express flow, the embodiment of life.”